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Mathematics is key to helping address the challenges within the Biology and Healthcare Systems sectors. The Newton Gateway to Mathematics has helped develop a number of Programmes of Work related to healthcare, particularly on medical imaging and aspects related to drug development and use in medical industries. The Gateway works as a delivery partner with the EPSRC Centre for Mathematical Imaging in Healthcare (CMIH) to help enhance partner and end-user engagement and interaction.

Upcoming Events

Understanding the Generation Time for COVID-19 will take place from 28th - 30th July 2021. The generation time of COVID-19 is the duration between the moment a person gets infected to the moment they infect another person (i.e. it’s the time between primary and secondary infection). This is very important in the context of new variants which may have different generation times, which in turn would have implications for the estimates of the R number. The generation time is also important for the evolution of new variants.This workshop will focus on understanding the different factors which affect the generation time, as well as the interaction between these, which will be important to be able to better assess what aspects of new variants may be of concern.

The aim of this event will be to hear talks related to each of the factors affecting the generation time, to try to understand current work and thinking in each area and in turn to try to identify how these may be more joined up. A key goal of this event is to build links between epidemic modellers and the wider modelling community with interests in COVID-19, such as within-host modelling teams – including, but not limited to members of RAMP-initiated projects.
 

Previous Events

New Models of Spatial and Social Behaviour in a Pandemic took place on 26th & 27th May 2021. This two day science meeting brought together two longer term research activities – urban analytics and human dynamics in small spaces. These RAMP-initiated projects are inter-related and differ mainly in terms of geographical scale. This event  therefore helped fulfil a key aim to maintain strong communication links between them, as well as extending to other relevant communities around COVID-19. It also sought to continue to gain further insights as lockdown restrictions are loosened in the coming months in order to provide supporting evidence and assistance to the scientists advising the government on national and local policy responses using urban analytics and spatial modelling. There are important implications for extending these models to embrace key social and economic issues that result from the pandemic and will be explored through future workshops.

The Flip Side of the Pandemic: Recent Advances in the Mathematics of Information took place on 20th May 2021.This half day conference brought together those academics working to advance data science and provided an update on the research and collaborations taking place at CCIMI specifically related to understanding and modelling the Coronavirus pandemic and associated challenges. Additionally, it helped to highlight other potential collaborative opportunities, as well as projects being developed elsewhere related to data analysis.

There was a short session of short “elevator pitches” from next generation researchers as well as a poster session by some registered delegates. A prize for the most enlightening poster by an ECR was awarded to Paolo Campodonico.

The new CMIH Centre for the Mathematics of Information held its first engagement event on 4th - 5th May 2021. The EPSRC Cambridge Mathematics of Information in Healthcare (CMIH) Hub was launched in 2020. It focuses on some of the most challenging public health problems of our time, including Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease and Dementia. There is a core mathematical component that is common to data challenges across these clinical disciplines, which the Hub will evaluate and address through its interdisciplinary collaborations. The overarching objective is to develop data analytics algorithms and provide the associated theory that is directly linked to the requirements in the clinic for healthcare decision making.

This was the first external event of the CMIH Hub and aimed to bring together those working in mathematical healthcare data analytics across the UK, including academic, clinical, and industrial users with mathematicians working in similar areas.The event included talks that highlighted open challenges and successes from CMIH Hub researchers and presented other potential collaborative opportunities, as well as projects being developed elsewhere related to healthcare data analytics.

Evolutionary Implications of the COVID-19 Vaccination Programme, took place on 19th & 20th April 2021. The COVID-19 vaccine is currently being rolled out in the UK and globally, but there is a limited supply available. Therefore, countries are having to prioritise which subgroups of the population will receive the vaccine first. For example, in the UK vaccination has been targeted at the older age groups, health-care workers and those that are at greater risk of needing hospitalisation as a result of contracting COVID-19. Such a strategy is focused on reducing disease rather than transmission, since currently the impacts of the vaccine on blocking transmission are still uncertain.

This workshop focused on the use of quantitative modelling approaches to understand the evolutionary implications of vaccination programmes. Such approaches are key to developing optimal vaccination strategies and understanding which subgroups in society should be prioritised for vaccination against COVD-19. A key goal of this event was to build links between epidemic modellers and the wider modelling community with interests in COVID-19, such as within-host modelling teams – including, but not limited to members of RAMP-initiated projects.

Environmental and Aerosol Transmission of COVID-19, was held from 26th - 28th April 2021. Better understanding of the transmission of COVID-19 is a key factor in managing risk and designing practical interventions. With the reduction of lockdown restrictions over the next few months, insights into areas such as the role of ventilation and the impact of people moving around within buildings are particularly timely. Building on the work begun by RAMP, this three-day science meeting reviewed existing work and identify where further research is most urgently needed. The meeting included a standalone public-facing component providing an accessible overview of the latest science, alongside scientific talks and discussion sessions targeting active researchers.

The aims of the meeting were to bring together a wide range of participants to maximise the engagement from different communities, better inform the public on the science underlying viral transmission & progress the most promising areas of research, and reach consensus on future research directions and research activity.

Modelling Solutions to the Impact of COVID-19 on Cardiovascular Waiting Lists – Virtual Study Group, was held on 2nd -  4th February 2021. This three-day virtual study group explored the challenges related to the delays in seeking and gaining access to cardiovascular treatments caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact this may have upon waiting lists. Clinicians have been able to report what has been happening with respect to the reduction in emergency cardiac admissions and procedures, as well as quantify the excess deaths from emergency cardiac conditions. They have not quantified the impact on outpatient consultations. This event aimed to form a predictive mathematical model that predicts the impact on waiting list numbers, morbidity and mortality resulting from different strategies for reducing the backlog in cardiac procedures and outpatient consultations.

Unlocking Data Streams on 16th March 2021 highlighted a number of exciting research activities and outlined some of the successful collaborations within the DataSıg Programme – which looks to address this key challenge of data science, to better understand multimodal data streams.
 
Sequential streams of information are pervasive; things happen and are recorded. These streams can be regular with all channels updating at once like sound. Alternatively, channels can update one at a time and maybe not at all, as things happen. An example of this is an electronic health record – which might capture hospital admission, a blood test, or perhaps a continuing ECG measurement. Managing this heterogeneous stream of data is a challenge. Often there is important information in the order of events that links the channel behaviour together. The Programme sought to further develop signature-based mathematical tools for dealing with complex streamed data, and connect with partners who have the capability and the challenges to benefit from and achieve significant outcomes with the methodology. Details about the event are on the webpage.

Mathematics and Statistics for Effective Regulation took place on Tuesday 17th November 2020. The reliability and accuracy of reporting is key to ensuring confidence in the financial sector, yet there is limited regulation on data quality and the software used, a lack of consistency and no agreed documentation of modelling. This is in contrast to medicines and medical devices, where there are auditable processes in place with the requirement to demonstrate the source of data used and the need to show documentation of the workings of the software.

IMA Mathematics 2020 Series Online took place in July. On 22nd July, Professor Jane Hutton spoke about Maths & Stats for Effective Regulation. This linked to Mathematics and Statistics for Effective Regulation that will take place on Tuesday 17th November 2020. The reliability and accuracy of reporting is key to ensuring confidence in the financial sector, yet there is limited regulation on data quality and the software used, a lack of consistency and no agreed documentation of modelling. This is in contrast to medicines and medical devices, where there are auditable processes in place with the requirement to demonstrate the source of data used and the need to show documentation of the workings of the software.

 Advances in Numerical Modelling​ - Applications of Geometric and Structure Preserving Methods took place on Tuesday 3rd December 2019. Geometric and structure preserving methods are a special class of numerical algorithms used to compute solutions to differential equations that preserve the underlying geometry and structure of the system. The key advantage of these methods is that they are not only computationally fast, but they also improve the accuracy of the computation since they are both quantitatively and qualitatively precise. This workshop showcased recent applications of geometric and structure preserving methods to models of real-world systems, as well as highlighting where advances in these types of numerical methods are most needed.​

Industrial Applications of Complex Analysis took place on Wednesday 30th October 2019. It showcased the state of the art in complex analysis methods and highlighted their current application in industrial settings, as well as where mathematical advances in this area are most needed. Complex analysis is a branch of mathematics that studies analytical properties of functions of complex variables. It lies on the intersection of several areas of mathematics, both pure and applied, and has important connections to asymptotic, harmonic and numerical analysis.

The programme for the day reflected the breadth of application areas where complex analysis methods are important and included talks representing both academic research and end-user perspectives from a range of different industrial areas. These also highlighted recent advances in complex analysis methods which have the potential to significantly improve a number of areas including understanding of aeroacoustics, medical imaging methods, tissue engineering approaches and fluid dynamics.​

Artificial Intelligence Developments in Healthcare Imaging took place on 23rd & 24th Oct 2019 at the INI. The EPSRC Centre for Mathematical Imaging in Healthcare (CMIH) held an engagement event in October 2019. This aimed to showcase the research being carried out at the Centre and presented an opportunity to hear in detail about some of the current project collaborations, other industry challenges and explore new potential collaborations.This event followed previous industry and academic engagement events delivered over the past three years.

This user engagement event focused on artificial intelligence and provided an update on some of the research projects and collaborations taking place in the CMIH. It featured presentations from CMIH researchers and Industry Partners, as well as other academics and end users in the public sector and industry. A number of industry challenges and collaborations were highlighted in an elevator pitch session.

Industrial and Clinical Application of Cardiac Simulations: Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions took place on Tuesday 4th June at the INI in Cambridge. The function of the heart can be simulated using multi-scale computational models: ranging from representations of electrical activation and force generation in a single cell; up to anatomical models of an individual patient’s whole heart and cardiovascular system. This knowledge exchange event by the Newton Gateway to Mathematics took place as part of the INI Research Programme on the Fickle Heart – within the workshop on Uncertainty Quantification for Cardiovascular Simulations. This particular event opened up the discussion to a wider audience, including those working in biotechnology, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and the public sector.

The introductory talks highlighted the key issues raised during the Research Programme and suggested some next steps.  A number of end-user talks from industry and the public sector described how organisations manage the uncertainty of modelling and the challenges they face.The programme for the day represents the breadth of application areas where geometric and structure preserving numerical methods are used and will include talks from both academic research and end-used perspectives from a number of application areas. Details about the event and registration are on the event webpage

Soft Matter Materials - Mathematical Design Innovations took place on 20th May 2019 and brought together mathematicians and scientists working in various areas of materials science and applied mathematics in order to initiate a systematic study of the optimal design of new complex materials. Mathematics is a key enabler in ensuring that technological advances in complex materials continue. It is integral to the design of various classes of materials, from solids, through to soft matter types. There is however, a need to improve theoretical understanding and modelling in this area, which to date, has been quite inadequate. Mathematical modelling can help to speed up complex material development, as well as promoting greater potential of actual applications.

From Wednesday 10th - Thursday 11th April 2019, the Newton Gateway to Mathematics delivered Achieving Impact in Healthcare: From Mathematics to Clinical Support Systems and Devices. This joint workshop of the five EPSRC Mathematics for Healthcare Centres focused on translating mathematical research into technological advances, as well as outreach and linkage with clinicians and end-user companies. It presented the opportunity to hear in detail about the project collaborations, research and outcomes from each Centre. The programme aimed not only to nurture the mathematical research associated with the Centres, but to engage end-users to ensure that best practice is spread as widely as possible.​

On Thursday 14th March, Quantum Computing in the Pharmaceutical Industry took place in collaboration with the Innovate UK Knowledge Transfer Network. The past two years have seen rapid advances in building scalable quantum computers. It is now widely expected that a device that cannot be simulated by any classical computer (so-called ‘quantum computational supremacy’) will emerge in 2019. The prospect of a relatively near-term device capable of a quantum advantage has sparked a huge amount of excitement in academia, industry and government funding.The workshop brought together experts in quantum computing, the pharmaceutical industry and (classical) computational methods to discuss if this is realistic and explore other potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

On Wednesday 27th February 2019 Mathematical Design for Solid Complex Materials took place as part of the INI Research Programme on The Mathematical Design of New Materials. This workshop aimed to highlight how mathematical modelling provides a rational way for understanding of complex materials properties and guiding the development strategy for such materials. Mathematical modelling forms the theoretical foundation for modern materials development. As well as being a descriptor for complex materials, such models are often the key to the discovery of the singular and unusual properties of the material. 
Talks focued on the application of Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) in :

  • Medical devices
  • Energy
  • Robotics.

On Tuesday 6th November 2018, TGM delivered Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Clinical Imaging Research. This was in partnership with the EPSRC Centre for Mathematical Imaging in Healthcare (CMIH) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). This event aimed to review scientific and policy developments in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) when applied to clinical imaging. It identified key steps that will expedite the delivery of research in the field, in partnership with academia, industry, patients and clinical researchers. 

On Tuesday 27th November 2018, Understanding Multi-Modal Data for Social and Human Behaviour took place. In an era of data deluge - sensors, cameras, computers and smart phones capture and store an unending torrent of data about human activity. The data is high-dimensional, sequential, complex, heterogeneous and multimodal in nature; but the sample size is small in comparison.  New scientific and technological methods are emerging that can allow meaningful and useful information to be extracted from data arising from human behaviour -  by allowing patterns to be predicted for the first time there are new opportunities for significant societal benefit. Rough Paths Theory (RPT) is emerging as a useful data science tool - it has at its core, the ability to describe complex behaviour concisely.

This event aimed to increase awareness of what is possible, whether it be better mitigation of risks, management of outcomes, or supporting individuals in their daily lives, across the spectrum of social and human behaviour. The day included end-user talks from the security, safety and human health and behaviour areas. It was of interest to those who wished to gain greater insight from complex sequential data.

On Wednesday 17th October 2018, TGM delivered the third annual user engagement/industry day with the EPSRC Centre for Mathematical Imaging in Healthcare (CMIH). This provided an update on some of the research being carried out at the Institute and featured presentations from CMIH Industry Partners and a number of industry challenges and potential new collaborations were highlighted in an elevator pitch session. 

On 2nd May 2018, the TGM delivered  Developments in Healthcare Imaging - Connecting with Academia, in partnerships with the EPSRC Centre for Mathematical Imaging in Healthcare (CMIH) and the Liverpool Centre for Mathematical Sciences in Healthcare (LCMH). This was the second academic engagement event that brought together those academics working on advances in imaging technology with researchers who investigate new image analysis methods, to help address current challenges. New imaging technology goes side by side with the need for mathematical models to maximise the information gain from these novel imaging techniques.The event was of interest to participants from the biomedical imaging, mathematics, engineering, computer science and physics, as well as biology and medicine.

On Wednesday 14th - Thursday 15th March 2018, the TGM helped to deliver Algorithms and Software for Quantum Computers in partnership with the Knowledge Transfer Network. This aimed to initiate development of quantum computer algorithms and software by bringing together real-world problem owners, mathematicians, algorithm experts, and academic quantum computer hardware experts to explain what code developers need to know to create software, without getting bogged down in the underlying physics. Discussion was in sufficient detail to spark immediate cooperation and collaboration. 

On 1st February 2018, the TGM delivered Taming Uncertainty in Mathematical Models Used in the Private and Public Sectors as part of the six month Programme at the INI on Uncertainty Quantification for Complex Systems: Theory and Methodologies. This event concentrated on how to handle uncertainty arising from the use of computer models and featured three end-user sessions including talks from the engineering, financial and healthcare sectors. These described how uncertainty is managed at present in a number of organisations and explored if we can cross-fertilise, for example, between engineering, finance and medicine.

On 6th December 2017, the TGM delivered Mathematics of Imaging and Vision as part of the INI Progarmme on Variational Methods and Effective Algorithms for Imaging and Vision. Imaging and vision is highly multidisciplinary – spanning mathematics, engineering, machine learning, computer vision and machine vision. There are numerous applications for this science in sectors such as medical imaging, security, geoscience, environment, food, manufacturing, agriculture, films, art and archeology.Talks from academics and end-users as well as discussions,  explored the challenges as well as the new horizons in theory, models, techniques and applications of mathematical imaging and vision.  

The TGM worked with the EPSRC Centre for Mathematical Imaging in Healthcare (CMIH) to deliver its second annual user engagement/ industry day on Wednesday 18th October 2017. Developments in Healthcare Imaging - Connecting with Industry provided an update on some of the research being carried out at the Institute and featured presentations from CMIH Industry Partners, including GSK and Toshiba Medical Visualisation Systems. A number of industry challenges and potential new collaborations were highlighted in an elevator pitch session and a poster exhibition ran during the lunch and the drinks/networking session.

On 19th April 2017, the TGM delivered CMIH's first annual academic conference. This followed the Centre's successful launch in March 2016 and the first annual user engagement/industry day held in October 2016, It was delivered in partnership with the Liverpool Centre for Mathematical Sciences in Healthcare (LCMH) and brought together academics working on advances in imaging technology with researchers who investigate new image analysis methods, to help address current challenges.

On 9th October 2016, the TGM hosted Developments in Healthcare Imaging - Connecting with Industry working with the EPSRC Centre for Mathematical Imaging in Healthcare. This was the Centre's first annual user engagment day and presented an opportunity to hear in detail about some of the current project collaborations, other industry challenges and explore new potential collaborations. It was of interest to researchers working in the field of analysis of clinical imaging and also to healthcare planners, clinicians, policy makers and industry partners who were able to discuss the research projects and challenges arising from the area.

On 8th March 2016, the TGM hosted the EPSRC Centre for Mathematical and Statistical Analysis of Multimodal Clinical Imaging Launch Event. In December 2015, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) announced a £10 million investment in five new UK Research Centres which will explore how mathematics and statistics can help clinicians to tackle serious health challenges such as cancer, heart disease and antibiotic resistant bacteria. Specifically, researchers will develop new tools from predictive mathematical models to enable earlier diagnosis of chronic diseases such as epilepsy, and new systems to make clinical imaging more accurate and efficient. The EPSRC Centre for Mathematical and Statistical Analysis of Multimodal Clinical Imaging in Cambridge aims to achieve synergies between applied mathematics and statistics through the focus on the analysis of clinical imaging, particularly that arising in neurological, cardiovascular and oncology imaging. This event was an opportunity to celebrate the launch of this important research centre and for researchers to meet with healthcare planners, clinicians, policy makers and industry partners to discuss the research projects and challenges arising from the analysis of clinical imaging. Further details on this event are available on the event webpage.

On 9th March 2016, the TGM hosted a Big Data, Multimodality & Dynamic Models in Biomedical Imaging workshop. The event aimed to bring together those working on advances in imaging technology with researchers who investigate new image analysis methods, to help address these challenges. This event was of interest to participants from the biomedical imaging industry, mathematics, engineering, computer science and physics, as well as biology and medicine.

In July 2015, the TGM ran an event on the Design of Experiments in Drug Development as part of an Isaac Newton Institute research workshop. The Open for Business event brought together leading expertise in the multiple disciplines involved in the design and analysis of experiments in healthcare. The workshop highlighted state-of-the-art design of experiments methodologies and how these can impact the wider societal health objectives. The programme focused on innovative methodologies to evaluate treatment effect and the adoption of innovative clinical trial designs.

With support from BAE Systems, and working with Microsoft and the University of Cambridge, the TGM delivered a 3-day research workshop on Challenges in Dynamic Imaging Data in June 2015 to investigate the area of the analysis of very large complex data streams. Each of the 3 days focused on a different industry area; Medical, Security and Creative / Media. Presentations were given by leading Academics and Industry representatives including a challenge talk from Siemens Healthcare.
 

At the end of 2014, the TGM hosted an Open for Business half day event, which was part of an Isaac Newton Institute research programme. The Understanding Microbial Communities - Developing the Potential workshop brought together industrial stakeholders with leading expertise from a number of academic disciplines including biology, mathematics, statistics, physics and engineering. In doing so it sought to identify the key areas where future application and development of mathematical and experimental approaches to microbial communities would be most beneficial from industrial and medical standpoints.

In September 2014, the TGM ran a week long NC3Rs/POEMS Network Maths Study Group: Mathematical Approaches to 3Rs Problems in Medicine and Healthcare. The aim was to tackle research problems which, if addressed, could help to replace, reduce or refine the use of animals in research (the 3Rs). The event was seen to provide a unique opportunity for mathematicians and biologists to work together.

Back in June 2014, an Isaac Newton Institute Open for Business event was held as part of the Infectious Disease Dynamics programme. The half-day workshop aimed to highlight fundamental problems inherent in modelling specific diseases and their public health impact. It brought together researchers and policy makers to help analyse where and why models fail in their predictions. There was also an insight into potential future research and the main challenges both in the understanding of public health needs and in methodology.